Juliet Carroll

Juliet Carroll

Fruit IPM Coordinator

New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, 630 W. North Street, Geneva, NY 14456
(315) 787-2430

Carroll is responsible for fostering arthropod, plant disease, weed, and vertebrate management by tree fruit, berry and grape growers of NY through IPM practices that minimize the use of pesticides. She works closely with Cornell Cooperative Extension educators, faculty, legislators, the fruit industry, consultants, and growers. Carroll directed the Plant Disease Clinic and 4H plant pathology program at Cornell and recently spent two years managing the multistate project on potato virus Y which has emerged as a tuber quality disease worldwide. She has conducted research on Dutch elm disease, maple decline, wheat spindle streak mosaic, carrot leaf blights, grapevine powdery mildew, tarnished plant bug, blueberry diseases, bacterial canker of cherry, potato virus Y, and spotted wing drosophila. She is author of over 200 extension and research publications and authored a monograph for high school biology teachers. As Fruit IPM Coordinator she carries 20% research and 80% extension responsibilities. Her work on bacterial canker of sweet cherry determined the disease could be effectively managed with fewer copper bactericide sprays, using properly timed pruning practices. Carroll invented Trac Software, a pesticide spray record-keeping program promoting market traceability and meeting federal and state pesticide reporting requirements. Carroll is project leader for the Network for Environment and Weather Applications (NEWA), newa.cornell.edu, a weather mesonet, that provides weather information and IPM tools via the Internet. Her collaborative research currently focuses on the invasive destructive insect spotted wing drosophila.

Research Focus

Carroll addresses IPM issues facing the tree fruit, berry and grape industries of New York State. She works closely with Cornell Cooperative Extension educators, faculty, legislators, the fruit industry, consultants, and growers. Carroll investigated the impact of copper bactericides and pruning practices for managing bacterial canker of sweet cherry. She surveyed blueberry plantings across NY and identified the need for targeted blueberry viral disease surveys. She participates in a multi-state project on limiting bird damage in fruit crops. She is currently investigating the utility of monitoring for management of spotted wing Drosophila in berry crops.

Carroll assists faculty in using weather information for their research on modeling pest phenology, disease development, and crop phenology by providing leadership and development of the Network for Environment and Weather App's (NEWA).

Outreach and Extension Focus

Carroll coordinates fruit IPM development and delivery statewide for tree fruit, grapes, and berries with the goal of minimizing economic, health and environmental risks. She works closely with Cornell Cooperative Extension educators, faculty, legislators, the fruit industry, consultants, and growers. She is the Fruit IPM Coordinator for the NYS IPM Program. Carroll invented Trac Software, a pesticide record-keeping and reporting program for fruit farmers which enables growers to meet market traceability requirements and federal and state pesticide safety requirements. Carroll is leader for the Network for Environment and Weather App's (NEWA), a weather mesonet, that provides weather information and IPM tools at newa.cornell.edu. She lead development of EurepGAP certification workbooks and workshops to educate apple growers, securing their 13 million dollar EU export market for New York apples. She serves as an advisor for the EcoApple production protocol. With Terence Robinson, she coordinated development of the Integrated Fruit Production Protocol (IFP) for Apples in New York. She is responsible for the Cornell Fruit Resources website www.fruit.cornell.edu. She gives on average 20 extension presentations to fruit growers on Trac Software, NEWA and fruit IPM topics each year.