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Brian Eshenaur Is New IPM Ornamental Educator in New York State

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 5, 2006
Contact: Donald Rutz, 315 787 2353, dar11@cornell.edu
Jennifer Grant, 315 787 2209, jag7@cornell.edu

by Mary Woodsen

Brian Eshenaur Is New IPM Ornamental Educator in New York State

Brian Eshenaur, M.S., has been hired as the western New York ornamental IPM educator with the New York State Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Program.

Eshenaur, a former educator with Cornell Cooperative Extension in Monroe County, led a horticulture program with a long-standing reputation for excellence. He built his reputation on accurate diagnoses—the lab processes about 30 a week—that identified not just run-of-the-mill disease pests but the oddball cases that stump most practitioners. But his outreach to dozens of nursery and landscape care professionals throughout Monroe County’s heavily populated cities and suburbs sealed it.

“Brian has provided us with a wealth of information,” says Jody Mills, diagnostic horticulturist at Broccolo Tree and Lawn Care in Rochester, New York, noting that Cooperative Extension’s services have been “absolutely essential” in keeping a solid IPM focus in all of Broccolo’s 2,800 client properties. “I’m always amazed at the knowledge he has.”

Eshenuar also started Cooperative Extension’s “Great Lawns/Great Lakes” program. Highly-trained master gardeners teamed up with homeowners to apply Cornell University research information and IPM methods that keep lawns healthy and attractive while reducing the potential to pollute nearby Lake Ontario. Runoff from misapplied fertilizers and pesticides—as much as 67 million pounds of pesticides are applied to home lawns each year in the U.S.—can contribute to water pollution.

“Brian has been among our most esteemed collaborators,” says Jennifer Grant, assistant director and community IPM coordinator for the New York State IPM Program. “We highly value his enthusiasm, innovativeness, and expertise, as well as the rich network of growers, educators, and pest management professionals he has cultivated.”

Eshenaur joins the program, which also recently hired ornamentals coordinator Elizabeth Lamb, on May 16, 2006. “Our educators and the ornamental industry are excited for us to be back up to full IPM staffing,” says Grant.